Posts

Flatford

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  My visit to Flatford today was to try and take photos with 'lead in ' lines.  It was a cold, cloudy morning but i think I achieved my aim. The best of the bunch!

Holywell's Park, Ipswich

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  Holywell's Park is a public park in Ipswich.  It covers an area of 67 acres.  It is a County Wildlife Site, a Conservation Area with two listed buildings – the Stable Block and Conservatory – and is on the English Heritage Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest. Holywells has been designated a Regionally Important Geodiversity Site (RIGS). It has a long history dating back to Medieval times. The Cobbold family purchased Pitt's Farm in 1811 for the spring water for their brewery business. It was the Cobbbold's who renamed it Holywell's Park. They later sold it on to the local council. Shaded area to sit in the park Twists and turns of the boughs of a tree Autumn colours The Lake

Mark's Hall

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My visit to Mark's Hall today was to see the snowdrop display and also to try and get some photos with some good 'lead in' lines. Dog Wood Trees I thought these striking Dog Wood trees with the path running between created a good lead in line. Meandering Stream The stream that meanders from the rushes at the bottom of the image to the bridge towards the top of the image was my next try at lead in lines.  I then realised the path to the side was also leading to the bridge from a different direction.  I think this caused to much confusion. Snowdrops through the woods My next image with lead in lines was the path through the woods with snowdrops on either side.  I thought this worked well. Snowdrops in the woods More snowdrops I left the snowdrop area to go and explore the Australasian area.  I love the smell of the eucalyptus trees and the way the bark peels off the trees rather than shedding its leaves. Patterns of the eucalyptus bark

Walton-on-the-Naze

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Some of the many colourful beach huts at Walton I hadn't been out with my camera for a while so as it was a bright sunny day I headed for Walton.  A higher than usual high tide was expected so I was hoping to get some photos of the water coming over the prom. More beach huts I was a bit late for the best of the waves but still managed to get some water images. Looking back towards the pier As I walked back towards the car I was able to take a few shots of the Sanderlings and Turnstones as they gathered food from the beach as the tide retreated.  

Levington Creek

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  I visited Levington Creek today as the tide was coming in as I wanted to try and photograph some of the wading birds that gather here at this time of year. Widgeon Although Widgeon do breed in the UK in small numbers, they are best known as winter visitors when there can be several hundred thousand of them.  They are usually with us between November and March.  They prefer mudflats and coastal grazing but they can be found on inland wetlands and sometimes feeding on agricultural land. Curlew I heard the Curlew calling long before I saw it by its evocative call. It is the largest European wading bird, recognisable by its long, downcurved bill, brown upperparts, and long legs. Curlews tend to favour estuary mudflats as a feeding grounds. The number of Curlew in the country increases considerably in the winter  as European Curlew join the residential birds. Lapwings While watching the Curlew I heard the call of the Lapwing as a flock flew over on the other side of the bank.  The rounde

Captain's Wood

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  Captain's Wood Captain's Wood is an ancient woodland full of rare plants and a mixture of natural habitats for a wide range of wildlife.  Fallow deer wander here freely among the oaks, birch and sweet chestnut trees. Nuts hidden by a squirrel, ready for winter Woodlouse hiding in a Sweet chestnut shell In spring there is a mass of bluebells to be found and a variety of fungi throughout the year. Fly agaric Common Puffball Dragonflies and Damselflies can be found around the pond in summer 

Arger Fen

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  Arger fen and Spouse's Vale are a mixture of ancient coppice woodland and new naturally regenerating woodland along side wet meadows. There is a mixture of trees such as oak, ash, field maple, holly, crab apple, alder and hazel plus wild cherry which exists in just a few of Suffolk's ancient woodlands. There is dry wooded areas and damp valley floors which create a rich environment for wildlife. There is a healthy population of badgers; lizards and grass snakes and the rare declining hazel dormouse and Barbastelle bat and many woodland birds.  Butterflies can be found on the wing in the summer months. There is also a large selection of wild flowers through spring and summer including a magnificent display of bluebells.